Frequently Asked Questions
 

General Marlin Questions

 

Marlin Community Organizations

 


General Marlin Questions

What is Marlin?

Marlin is an interoperable and open digital content sharing platform. The technology places the consumer at the center of a domain of rich services and devices, allowing for intuitive access and use of digital content. Marlin is based on a general-purpose rights management architecture that allows for substantial flexibility and control in implementation and is developed through an open community initiative.

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Who founded Marlin?

Five companies — Intertrust, Panasonic, Philips, Samsung and Sony — joined together in 2005 to develop specifications for next-generation digital rights management (DRM) technology.

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What are Marlin's key features?

Marlin defines how devices and services can interoperate to provide consumers with valuable content distribution options. Marlin manages the relationships among consumers, their devices, and their content in an intuitive way and allows for a rich variety of business models for content services. See a detailed list of features and benefits here. Or, view more technical white papers, such as the Marlin Architecture Overview, here

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What makes Marlin different from other DRM technologies?

First, Marlin reflects the input of a broad spectrum of interests and exists within a community environment. Second, Marlin is based on comprehensive and advanced DRM technology that offers significant control and flexibility in implementation. Finally, Marlin offers a full solution. Service providers and device manufacturers can develop and deploy interoperable, compelling, and competitive multimedia distribution systems across all networks with Marlin.

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What is the relationship between Marlin and OMA DRM?

Marlin and OMA DRM are complementary technology standards. OMA DRM relates to the mobile device and service market while Marlin has application in additional markets, including broadband, broadcast and IPTV services. Through its OMArlin specification, Marlin elegantly extends OMA-enabled mobile applications into consumer electronics home networks.

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What is relationship between Marlin and the Coral Consortium?

Marlin is a content sharing, digital rights management (DRM) technology. Coral defines a simple set of interfaces that facilitate support for multiple DRM technologies within a content delivery ecosystem of devices and services.

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Why is Marlin based on an open, standards-driven community development process?

Marlin is developed with the input of many interested parties primarily to drive the adoption in the market. The technology should support the market needs, not the other way around, and an open process ensures that the interests of value chain participants across many vertical markets are represented and reflected in the specifications and technology enhancements that emerge. The process also ensures interoperability while allowing for business differentiation in implementation.

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Is Marlin more easily "hacked" because it is based on an open community development process?

No. The security of the system is separate from the technology itself. Marlin is the technology used to enable a rich assortment of content distribution services and devices. Marlin-enabled devices and services that are available in the market are governed by independent trust services that enforce compliance with commercial standards as well as manage revocation and renewal services in the event of security breaches.  (See also the question “What are the Marlin community organizations?” below.)

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What technologies are incorporated into Marlin?

The core system specifications, including underlying reference technologies, define elements common to most Marlin implementations. The core specifications are based on the Octopus and NEMO reference technologies, which have been adapted for peer-to-peer device interactions. See the Technology overview section or the Downloads area for additional information.   

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 What is Octopus?

Octopus is the general-purpose DRM architecture that is extremely expressive and allows for flexible business rules. At the center of an Octopus system is a graph-based relationship engine. In Marlin, Octopus node objects are used to represent system entities (such as users and devices), and links between nodes represent relationships. The system of nodes and links is integral to managing where, how, and when content can be used in a Marlin system.

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What is NEMO?

NEMO is an acronym for Networked Environment for Media Orchestration. It provides a services-based framework for trusted connections between various components of a Marlin system.

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Marlin Community Organizations
 

What are the Marlin organizations?

There are two separate Marlin organizations – the Marlin Developer Community (MDC) and the Marlin Trust Management Organization (MTMO) – with very different functions.

The MDC is responsible for developing and maintaining the Marlin technology specifications; maintaining a Community Source Program with reference technologies, SDKs, etc.; and promoting the adoption of Marlin technology through the Marlin Partner Program (MPP).

The MTMO is responsible for trust services. It provides Compliance and Robustness requirements; Refusal, Remediation, and Renewability services; and a list of trusted service providers for key management, trust operations, and associated licensing functions. The MTMO is responsible for designating products and services as being Marlin-compliant.


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How do companies get involved with Marlin?

MDC participants evaluate and develop specifications, write and use community code, etc.

MDC partners (through the MPP) identify and build component Marlin solutions, or work with adopters to design, build, integrate, test, and deploy Marlin solutions.

MTMO adopters build products and services; certify them, and license keys and certificates.

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Can companies build on top of the reference Implementations, or are they primarily to demonstrate that the specifications work?

The Marlin reference implementations may give you valuable insight for building commercial implementations. However, the reference implementations are mainly for illustration and verification of the Marlin specifications, as well as prototyping. They are not suited as a base for commercial product implementations.

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